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Motif-x Logo

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Information:
motif-x (short for motif extractor) is a software tool designed to extract overrepresented patterns from any sequence data set. The algorithm is an iterative strategy which builds successive motifs through comparison to a dynamic statistical background.

Please cite the following:
Chou MF & Schwartz D (2011). Biological sequence motif discovery using motif-x. Curr Protoc Bioinformatics. Chapter 13:Unit 13.15-24. doi:10.1002/0471250953.bi1315s35.
PDF (1.8M) | PubMed

Schwartz D & Gygi SP (2005). An iterative statistical approach to the identification of protein phosphorylation motifs from large-scale data sets. Nature Biotechnology 23(11):1391-1398.
PDF (728K) | Supplementary Information | PubMed



Scan-x Logo

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by clicking here you certify that you meet the requirements specified
by the disclaimer at the bottom of this page

Information:
scan-x is a software tool designed to find motifs (identified using motif-x) within any sequence data set. The first large scale scan was performed using all available human, mouse, fly and yeast phosphorylation and acetylation data to perform a scan for undiscovered sites.

Please cite the following:
Chou MF & Schwartz D (2011). Using the scan-x Web site to predict protein post-translational modifications. Curr Protoc Bioinformatics. Chapter 13:Unit 13.16. doi:10.1002/0471250953.bi1316s36.
PDF (608K) | PubMed

Schwartz D, Chou MF and Church GM (2009). Predicting protein post-translational modifications using meta-analysis of proteome-scale data sets. Mol Cell Proteomics 8(2):365-79.
PDF (2.4 M) | Supplemental Data | PubMed

Feedback:
Suggestions are always welcomed. Please e-mail Daniel Schwartz at daniel.schwartz(at)uconn.edu.



Disclaimer:
The software provided on this website may be used freely by users from academic and non-profit organizations. Users from the commercial sector should contact Daniel Schwartz (daniel.schwartz(at)uconn.edu).

Please note:
Periodic maintenance of the HMS computer cluster can cause problems with this website beyond our control. Please notify us (by emailing mchou(at)genetics.med.harvard.edu) if you do experience problems as we are not always aware of them.


website created by Michael Chou and Daniel Schwartz (Church Lab)
© 2005-2008 The President and Fellows of Harvard College.